Constant BSoD after having installed some RAM and an SSD. — Micro Center

Constant BSoD after having installed some RAM and an SSD.

Ever since I installed some RAM (16bg: x2 8g sticks) and a new SSD (Samsung Evo 1TB), I've gotten consistent BSoD. I'm ran memory tests, ran disk checks, replaced the ram (wanted to replace the SSD if it had a bad sector, but I didn't get the warranty on that and was past the return date policy), did a clean install of windows 10,  even took apart my pc and re-seated and disconnecting and reconnecting all my cables. I'm at the point that I might have to just take it in and have someone diagnose it because I'm at my wits end. If anyone can offer any other fixes or solutions, I'm open to any ideas.

Comments

  • TSMikeWTSMikeW admin
    We can certainly provide some advice, but we'll need more information. Please list the BSOD's you're seeing. Also, is the EVO NVME or SATA SSD? Could you also tell us what kind of RAM you have, mainly the frequency, timings and voltage. Also, what is the RAM actually running at? How frequent are the BSOD's? Do they only happen under load, or are they random?

  • The EVO is SATA, Ripjaws 4 x 8g sticks of ram (DDR4, 3200MHz, CL16-18-18-38, 1.35v)
    They seem to happen after running my computer under a heavy load, and when it does happen, my system has them back to back. Sometimes I can have my computer running all day without a hitch. Other days, I run for maybe 4-5 hours, and then it crashes, and it does sometimes it does it back to back and I just have to wait for it to stabilize.

  • The EVO is SATA, Ripjaws 4 x 8g sticks of ram (DDR4, 3200MHz, CL16-18-18-38, 1.35v)
    They seem to happen after running my computer under a heavy load, and when it does happen, my system has them back to back. Sometimes I can have my computer running all day without a hitch. Other days, I run for maybe 4-5 hours, and then it crashes, and it does sometimes it does it back to back and I just have to wait for it to stabilize.
    Are you manually underclocking and lowering the timings? The CPU-Z screenshot you attached is showing what appears to be 1866mhz C13-13-13-31-44-2T despite listing 32GB of DDR4. Can you confirm if the memory you added is identical to the memory that was originally installed? This means identical part numbers, not just identical timings and frequency. While you might have matching frequency and primary timings, memory manufacturers often source their memory from multiple vendors such as Samsung, Micron and SK Hynix. Mixing these IC's can lead to instability depending on what secondary and tertiary timings they prefer.

    I would recommend clearing CMOS and loading BIOS defaults and see if the memory is stable at stock clock speeds. From there, load your XMP profile and try again. Make sure when you load XMP that the memory is running at its advertised speeds, not 1866 C13. 

  • So I looked into the bios, and my CPU was actually under clocking my RAM. I changed the XMP profile, although it's still being under clocked, my system seems stable. I haven't had a BSoD in two days, which is better than how it was, which was my computer at least crashing once a day. CPU-Z is still giving me the same results about my memory. I don't know what to do about stabilizing my memory so that it's not being under clocked.
  • Sometimes you'll get two XMP profiles. The one listed on the stick, DDR4 3200, [email protected] is the first profile. It looks like you also had a low latency profile, which is the DDR4-1866, 13-13-13-31 that you're running. This is typically a second profile. make sure it's running profile 1 and see if you can run at the rated DDR4-3200 profile without issue.
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